Friday, 11 December 2009

Rendering: mental ray_Relative Intensity of Highlights




Often, just leaving mental ray and its shaders to work out the highlights isn’t enough.
There is a function named relative intensity of highlights. It is very useful to “boost up” highlights that are not very apparent on the surface. It can be found on the advanced rendering options parameters, under the advanced reflectivity options group.

For the above image I had increased its values to about 30 however, depending on the specific scene one may be required to increase or decrease these values.By the way, this chrome material was applied to all the metal frames by the door entrance and windows.


Note: These values only affect objects that already have some sort of shine on them and somewhat being affected the by light.


Moreover, the visible area lights cause no highlights function could also be unchecked to further increase the highlights however, it is not always required.





I hope you have found this post useful.


Please check my new channels below:


Checkout below my other Courses with High Resolution Videos, 3d Project files and Textures included.


Course 1: Exterior Daylight with V-Ray + 3ds Max + Photoshop  

Course 2: Exterior Night with V-Ray + 3ds Max + Photoshop

Course 3: Interior Daylight with V-Ray + 3ds Max + Photoshop

Course 4: Interior Night with V-Ray + 3ds Max + Photoshop

Course 5: Studio Lights with V-Ray + 3ds Max + Photoshop


Also, please Join my Patreon page to download other Project files; Watch more Videos and receive Technical Support. Finally, check out my New channels below:

https://www.patreon.com/user?u=2469908  




New Book: 3D Photorealistic Rendering: Interiors & Exteriors with V-Ray and 3ds Max



More tips and Tricks:

Post-production techniques

Tips & tricks for architectural Visualisation: Part 1

Essential tips & tricks for VRay & mental ray

Photorealistic Rendering

Creating Customised IES lights

Realistic materials

Creating a velvet/suede material 

FoxRenderfarm

www.arroway-textures.com 

Renderpeople

Gobotree

Rendering: mental ray_Adding glow to the window glass



The above image was produced whilst at GMJ Design Ltd


In our latest book, we have covered a number of ways of emulating light without the need of creating a physical light.


Production companies often adopt similar methods to reduce the rendering times and retain the overall quality.
It is worth pointing out that the usage of Ambient Occlusion(i.e. AO) as a separate pass or/and directly from Max is utterly imperative for the final shot.


The following exercise will take you through another unique methodology of achieving similar results with reduced rendering times:

Another quick way of emulating “glow”/"light" on windows, is to in fact enable the glow function on the glass panes themselves.

To do this, simply go to the main material parameters, under the "refraction" group.

1-Reduce the transparency to about 0.9 to prevent the surface from being fully transparent.

2-To add a bit of blur to the transparency, decrease the glossiness to about 0.78. Note that, these values may vary depending on one’s camera angle...and the level of transparency/blurriness intended.

3-Next,change the colour swatch from white to a warm yellow.
Also, the "fast (interpolate)" function, can be enabled for quick and fast results, as the glossiness and its samples can often slow down the renders.However,it may create artifacts.

4-Pan down to the "self illumination (glow)" parameters and enable the "self illumination (glow)" function.

5-Under the "luminance" group, change it from "unitless" to "physical units: cd/m2)". Also, pick and choose any relevant bitmap (i.e. photo) that has a prominent light source.


Note: The "unitless" function often creates artifacts on glossy reflections, therefore, to be avoided at all costs.


Depending on time in hand, one can set the glow to generate light, or not, through the FG, by checking the "illuminates the scene (when using fg)" function.
...and... “...let there be light...”!!!

The final rendered image below was achieved using this technique. I hope you like it.




I hope you have found this post interesting.




Checkout below my other Courses with High Resolution Videos, 3d Project files and Textures included.

Course 1: Exterior Daylight with V-Ray + 3ds Max + Photoshop  

Course 2: Exterior Night with V-Ray + 3ds Max + Photoshop

Course 3: Interior Daylight with V-Ray + 3ds Max + Photoshop

Course 4: Interior Night with V-Ray + 3ds Max + Photoshop


Course 5: Studio Lights with V-Ray + 3ds Max + Photoshop


Also, please Join my Patreon page to download other Project files; Watch more Videos and receive Technical Support. Finally, check out my New channels below:

https://www.patreon.com/user?u=2469908  




New Book: 3D Photorealistic Rendering: Interiors & Exteriors with V-Ray and 3ds Max


More tips and Tricks:

Post-production techniques

Tips & tricks for architectural Visualisation: Part 1

Essential tips & tricks for VRay & mental ray

Photorealistic Rendering

Creating Customised IES lights

Realistic materials

Creating a velvet/suede material 

FoxRenderfarm

www.arroway-textures.com 

Renderpeople

Gobotree

Monday, 23 November 2009

Design interior: mental ray_office project




Hi All,


The above image is part of a project I have finished recently. It was quite challenging in a sense that the client was very particular about the direction they wanted to take with regards to lighting,colours,depth,etc.

I would normally use warm photometric lights however,in this particular project the client opted for white photometric lights instead (i.e. D65 illuminant...white) in order to help preserve the original colours of all other objects in the Max scene.

In addition, I have used similar techniques to the ones used in the chapter 06 of my latest book.Which essentially consists in starting out with a fairly dark scene even when the daylight system is already applied;followed by gradually adding artificial photometric lights and test rendering until satisfied with the overall lighting.
Often, one can easily lose control of the depth in the scene when adding numerous artificial lights and exposure controls.


The ceiling imperfections were achieved by using the mental ray's "Utility Bump Combiner(adsk)" shader in conjunction with cellular and noise procedural materials applied to its multiple toggles(i.e. Utility Bump Combiner adsk).

The render came straight from 3Ds Max using mental ray,no post effects were needed. The total amount of images delivered for this project was 6. I hope you like the final result.


It is also worth mentioning that, I am in no way discouraging users to use Photoshop and other post effects applications however,one should always try to take advantage of Max's full potential.


Cheers,


Checkout below my other Courses with High Resolution Videos, 3d Project files and Textures included.

Course 1: Exterior Daylight with V-Ray + 3ds Max + Photoshop  

Course 2: Exterior Night with V-Ray + 3ds Max + Photoshop

Course 3: Interior Daylight with V-Ray + 3ds Max + Photoshop

Course 4: Interior Night with V-Ray + 3ds Max + Photoshop



Also, please Join my Patreon page to download other Project files; Watch more Videos and receive Technical Support. Finally, check out my New channels below:

https://www.patreon.com/user?u=2469908  



More tips and Tricks:

Post-production techniques

Tips & tricks for architectural Visualisation: Part 1

Essential tips & tricks for VRay & mental ray

Photorealistic Rendering

Creating Customised IES lights

Realistic materials

.