Monday, 5 January 2015

Photoshop tips for 3D production_Part 2



Happy New Year to Everyone first and foremost:

Remember the laughter, the joy, the hard work and the tears. 
And as you reflect on the past year,also think of the new one to come.  
Because most importantly, this is a time of new beginnings and the celebration of life


Photoshop tips for 3D production_Part 2


                                         
                     Play Video with Custom Captions/Subtitles
                                                                           
Optimising 2d file sizes using the “Save for Web & Devices…”

When sending drafts or pre-finalised images to clients for comments and/or signing off, most users tend to use the “Save as…” tool, or/and resize the image/s.

With pre-finalised images, the above mentioned approach may prevent clients from making the right judgment about the image/s and subsequently NOT signing off the image/s as quickly as anticipated.

When using the above mentioned approach (i.e. Save as, etc.), clients often comment on the pixel quality and the image size.

In addition, it may prove to be, a bit of a challenge to send multiple files via email.
To address all of the above issues (when sending pre-finalised images), some companies tend to use the “Save for Web & Devices…” tool, instead.

1-To do so, in Photoshop, click on the “File” main toolbar, and choose the “Save for Web & Devices…” tool from its drop down list. 



Note: If you are using a more recent version of Photoshop, this function can be found under: File>Export>Save for web (Legacy)




2-If the pre-finalised image is exceedingly big in pixel dimensions (i.e. in this example it was 7360x4912), you’ll be prompted with a “Save for Web” warning dialog related to memory errors and slow performance.

Accept it by clicking “Yes” to open it.  





3-With the “Save for Web & Devices” dialog open, Photoshop automatically chooses the “Optimized” tab with its “ideal” “optimized” values (i.e. Quality=60), without compromising the quality of the original image. 

This useful dialog offers users the option to compare between the “Original” tab, and the “Optimized” tab parameters.

On each tab, the user can see and compare the quality between, the file sizes (i.e. at the bottom); set the “Image Size”, etc.
Always pan (using the pan tool) to areas of the image that are more prone to scrutiny by the client. 
In this example, we have focused mainly on the rendered areas of the main building.   

Furthermore, the “Preset” quality was changed to 30 and left the “Image Size” parameters untouched.

As one can see between the “Optimized” and the “Original” tab below, the image went from 103 MB, to 3.692 MB in size, without affecting the overall quality of the image or its dimensions.

Once satisfied with the final optimization, simply click “Save” and choose the location to save the file in. 





It’s worth mentioning that, one can also use Photoshop actions to automate this process for the subsequent images.
For more information about Photoshop actions, please check the previous post:



4-Alternatively, users can also use the “Batch” tool to automate actions.
To do so, simply click on the “File” main toolbar, followed by choosing to “Automate” and “Batch” from the drop down list.




The “Batch” dialog box is broken down into five groups: Play, Source, Destination, File Naming and Errors. 



Play: This group allows users to pick and choose pre-created action parameters such as Set and Action.

Source: This group allows users to locate the folder where all the files will be sourced or collected from.

To choose the folder, simply click on the “Source” toggle.

The source folder comes with four functions:

Override Action “Open” Commands

Include All Subfolders

Suppress File Open Options Dialogs

Suppress Color Profile Warnings

Alternatively, users can simply click on the “Source” drop down list and choose the “Opened Files” option.

The “Opened Files” option automatically sources the open files in Photoshop.


Destination: This group allows users to determine the location of the Saved file/s. 

Users can choose from the following options:

None

Save and Close

Folder

The "Folder" option allows users to choose the file destination and to Override Action “Save As” Commands.

File Naming: This group allows users to add numerous variables from the drop down list of the name field.

The most commonly used variables from the drop down list are:

Document Name

NONE

EXTENSION

The variable under the name of “EXTENSION” in fact adds the file extension name in front of its name (I.e. name.GIF).   

The “Starting serial#” function, automatically adds a serial number/s to the file name. 
To omit file numbering, simply keep this field clear, by simply “deleting” the number/s in this section.  

Errors: This group allows users to either “Stop for Errors” (if any) during the file batching process, or to simply “Log Errors To File” (if any).

I hope you have found this article somehow useful. 

Ta


Important Terminologies & Descriptions:

Post-Production: Is the process of creating effects or/and results after/post the main process.
This terminology can be used to describe the results (post-production) of main processes such as 3d renderings  and/or filming a scene.
The post-production often takes place in applications such as Photoshop, After Effects, Nuke, etc.   
Some of the articles, Videos and Tutorials depicted here will take you through the process.
 
3d Rendering: Is the process of converting the three dimensional (3D) data seen in a 3d scene into 2D image/s (rasterized).
The rasterization process include, the rendering parameters, the rendering engine, lights, 3d models, textures, shaders, and other effects. 
3D renders can be a sequence of animated objects/effects/cameras, or a single frame with a still camera and object/s.
Some of the articles, Videos and Tutorials depicted here will take you through the process of rendering.

Photorealistic Rendering: Is the Process or Art of making a typical Computer Generated Image/render (CGI) look indistinguishable from a real photo.
To achieve this, users often need to possess the skills and the"eye" to appreciate good photography, cameras, composition, lighting, shaders, materials, 3d modelling, rendering and have some post-production skills. 
Some of the articles, Videos and Tutorials depicted here will help you achieve truly photorealistic renderings. 



Architectural Rendering, or architectural illustration/Visualization, is the art/process of creating two-dimensional images or animations depicting the attributes of an architectural design, while using state of the art applications such as, Autocad, 3ds max, VRay, Cinema 4d, Blender, Maya, Corona, Photoshop, etc
Some of the articles, Videos and Tutorials depicted here will take you through this amazing process.

Textures: Is a term often used to describe photographed  2d images to be later used in a toggle of a shader or procedural map.
Textures can be used in the Diffuse toggle, Reflect, Glossy effects, Bump, Displacement, etc. 

Some of the articles, Videos and Tutorials depicted here will take you through the process of applying textures.

Materials: Is a term often used to describe maps, textures,procedural maps or shaders, depending on the context the term is being used.
Some of the articles, Videos and Tutorials depicted here will take you through the process of applying materials.


Procedural materials: Is a term often used to describe maps with editable/proprietary parameters/functions.
Some of the articles, Videos and Tutorials depicted here will take you through the process of applying procedural materials.


Shaders: Is a term often used to describe complex materials with functions and procedural maps created for a specific purpose.
Some of the articles, Videos and Tutorials depicted here will take you through the process of applying shaders.

Architectural Rendering, or architectural illustration/Visualization, is the art/process of creating two-dimensional images or animations depicting the attributes of an architectural design, while using state of the art applications such as, Autocad, 3ds max, VRay, Cinema 4d, Blender, Maya, Corona, Photoshop, etc
Some of the articles, Videos and Tutorials depicted here will take you through this amazing process.

Studio Lights: They are fundamental in the process of creating appealing images/renders.
Lighting determines not only the brightness and darkness, but also the tone, mood and the atmosphere of a scene.
Hence the importance to control and manipulate the lights accordingly, in order to fully capture the textures and the vibrancy of your objects.

By distributing the shadows and the highlights accurately, you can achieve truly appealing images/renders.

V-Ray: Is a rendering engine that uses global illumination algorithms, including path tracing, photon mapping, irradiance maps and directly computed global illumination.
Furthermore, it is used as a commercial plug-in for third-party 3D computer graphics software applications such as 3ds max, Maya, Houdini, Blender, Nuke, etc,  for visualizations and computer graphics in industries such as media, entertainment, film and video game production, industrial design, product design and architecture.

3ds Max: Autodesk 3ds Max, formerly 3D Studio and 3D Studio Max, is a professional 3D computer graphics program designed to create 3D animations, models, games and images.
In addition, it has modelling, animation and movie effects capabilities, frequently used by video game developers, TV commercial studios and architectural visualization studios.
3ds Max also features shaders, dynamic simulations, particle systems, plug-ins, and much more, with its own scripting language.

Adobe Photoshop: Photoshop is a powerful raster based graphics program produced by the Adobe Corporation. 
It is widely used for a variety of photo/image editing purposes worldwide. The program has a huge number of filters, functions, plug-ins, scripts, etc.
In addition, there is a huge online support for this software, and countless online sites with tips and tutorials.
Finally, there are readily available books, online/college courses, and its full documentation at Adobe.com





Checkout below my other Courses with High Resolution Videos, 3d Project files and Textures included.

Course 1: Exterior Daylight with V-Ray + 3ds Max + Photoshop  

Course 2: Exterior Night with V-Ray + 3ds Max + Photoshop

Course 3: Interior Daylight with V-Ray + 3ds Max + Photoshop

Course 4: Interior Night with V-Ray + 3ds Max + Photoshop




Also, please Join my Patreon page to download other Project files; Watch more Videos and receive Technical Support. Finally, check out my New channels below:

https://www.patreon.com/user?u=2469908  




Please also check:

My 3D Portfolio:

New Book: 3D Photorealistic Rendering: Interiors & Exteriors with V-Ray and 3ds Max

Post-production techniques

Essential tips & tricks for VRay & mental ray

Photorealistic Rendering

Creating Customised IES lights

Realistic materials

Creating a velvet/suede material 

FoxRenderfarm

www.arroway-textures.com 

Renderpeople

Gobotree





1 comment:

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